Column: Immunity and weekend plans

Note: I’ve decided to start posting my column here after it’s been published in the paper. This one ran Sunday, Sept. 20.

The nurse read my labs, furrowed his eyebrows and looked back at me.
“Your immune system is down this week,” he said. “It’s not a problem, it’s just at the lowest it’s been during your treatment.”
I was at the CAMC Cancer Center that morning for my penultimate chemotherapy treatment. I was so close to being done that I could practically feel the hair regrowing on my bald head. Up until that point, we’d been talking about our plans for the weekend. My friend and I were planning to go to a farm in Putnam County and take photos in a field of sunflowers.
This immune system stuff wasn’t really surprising news. If you know anything at all about chemotherapy, it’s that it weakens your immune system. Infections and viruses like the flu can be more serious in cancer patients, so even those who aren’t going through chemotherapy during a global pandemic are told to avoid sick people and take precautions. But it was news. While my red blood cells had been done previously, before then, none of my previous weekly lab tests had revealed any issues with my immune system.
You might think having a weakened immune system in the middle of a pandemic would scare me, but it didn’t. The thing about the novel coronavirus pandemic is that it’s already causing me to do everything I can do to avoid catching a disease I’m not immune to. When I’m not holed up in my apartment (I am most of the time), I’m wearing a mask, avoiding crowds, staying at least six feet away from other people and washing my hands frequently. The COVID-19 pandemic has taught me well what to do when your immunity is down.

Me in the canoe at Beech Fork


So I didn’t change my weekend plans, though the rain on Sunday altered them a little. My friend and I decided to go to Beech Fork State Park in Barboursville Saturday. We paid $1.50 to feed the carp and then rented a canoe. It was a nice afternoon with plenty of social distance. It was so good to feel well and to be out doing something different for the first time in a while. The sunflower field closed because of rain on Sunday, so we didn’t get to go.
Speaking of things closing, did I mention I’m almost done with chemotherapy? As I’m writing this, I’m three days away from going in for my last treatment. If you’re reading this on Sunday, I’m already done.
This chemotherapy drug, Taxol, has been mild on me compared to the previous regime of Adriamycin and Cytoxan. The worst part for me was anemia, and that seems to have gotten better on its own. Many patients get neuropathy from Taxol. My fingertips have started to feel kind of funny in the last couple of weeks, which makes me think it might be the start of neuropathy, but it’s not been bad.
Despite the mild side effects, I’m ecstatic to have this part of cancer treatment behind me. All week I’ve been thinking of how to celebrate after work on Friday. I’m looking forward to growing out my hair and eventually getting back to running.
This won’t be the end of cancer treatment; I’ll have radiation next. Stay tuned to hear how I deal with the burns and exhaustion I’ve heard are so common with that form of treatment.
On another note, thank you to everyone who has donated to my online fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. It means a lot to me to be able to help raise money that benefits cancer research and supports programs for other patients.

One thought on “Column: Immunity and weekend plans

  1. Continuing to pray for you, Lori. You are brave and courageous. I love keeping in touch by your blog. May God continue to heal and bless you..❤️🙏Jan Stevens

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